Best Canoeing in Florida

Trying to find the best canoeing in Florida? Bivy has great hiking, biking, paddling, climbing, skiing, riding and more, with hand-curated trail maps, as well as detailed driving directions.

1

Florida, Titusville

01 :47 hrs
4 mi
1.4283485 ft
I

Fox Lake is a small but scenic lake that offers quiet waters and undeveloped shoreline for exploration in a designated recreation area. The site offers a convenient boat launch area as well as picnic areas and hiking trails. Fox Lake also connects to South Lake by way of a small channel which is a scenic waterway that leads to an even larger lake that is great for additional exploration.

2

Florida, Hernando County

02 :26 hrs
5.4 mi
4.065143 ft
I

The Weeki Wachee River is a enjoyable and scenic day paddle that explores the clear and wildlife-filled river in the heart of Florida's Nature Coast. The clear water makes it easy to see lots of underwater wildlife including fish, turtles, alligators, and manatees. The put-in is at the state park which is home to a mermaid show that takes place in the springs. The river is slow flowing and very mild but there are not any other access points between the state park and Roger's Park.

3

Florida, Palm Beach County

03 :47 hrs
8.4 mi
4 ft
II

The Loxahatchee is one of two Wild and Scenic Rivers in Florida, the other being the Wekiva River, near Orlando. This is an an official canoe trail along a stretch of the river offers some of the best paddling available in the whole state. The run begins from the canoe launch at Riverbend Park which is easily accessible with lots of parking. The run then travels over 8 miles downstream to a take-out at Jonathan Dickinson State Park boat ramp. The canoe trail travels through mostly undeveloped natural terrain that is home to lots of wildlife, including multiple species of endangered birds. There are two small dams that can either be run or portaged. Both Riverbend Park and Jonathan Dickinson State Park offer picnic areas and lots of hiking and biking trails.

4

Florida, Volusia County

00 :21 hrs
0.4 mi
0.990048 ft
I

Blue Springs is the largest spring on the St. Johns River and is a scenic and enjoyable paddling destination that provides opportunity to view lots of wildlife including manatees. The water is crystal clear and warm. The run is not open between mid November and mid March for manatee season. The park also offers easy access to the St. John's River which provides miles of additional paddling. The park is popular and reaches capacity so be sure to arrive early.

5

Mississippi, Wiggins

04 :16 hrs
9.5 mi
1.1998672 ft
I

Flint Creek Reservoir is a 600-acre lake located in the Flint Creek Water Park in Wiggins. The lake is stocked with bass, bream, crappie, and catfish. Boating, waterskiing, swimming, jet skiing, and paddling are other popular activities on the water. Also available is the parks waterslides. Many other family recreational opportunities are available. The scenery is wonderful and wildlife is abundant with thick, beautiful forest filling the shorelines. Wild turkey, deer, squirrels, ducks, and other waterfowl can often be found along the lakeside.

6

Florida, Marion County

01 :37 hrs
3.6 mi
1.1244788 ft
I

This short tributary of the Withlacoochee River is a well-known spot for recreation that offers beautiful clear waters for paddling and wildlife viewing. The river originates from one of the largest springs in Florida and is home to lots of underwater wildlife that is easily visible from watercraft. Setting off from K.P. Hole Park, paddlers can explore the Rainbow River downstream for almost 4 miles to a take-out at CR 484. The river can also be paddled upstream towards the springs but this is a bit more physically challenging. The area is popular with boaters and tubers, especially on the weekends, and there is quite a bit of development, but the scenery is still impressive and very worthwhile.

7

Florida, Tampa

01 :23 hrs
3.1 mi
0.0329628 ft
I

This Hillsborough River flows for over 50 miles through diverse habitats between the Green Swamp and Hillsborough Bay, providing enjoyable paddling trips for paddlers of all skill levels. The first section of the designated paddling trail is just over 3 miles between Hillsborough River State Park and Dead River Park access and is the best part of the river for beginner paddlers. This section of river is well-defined and deeper, with fewer obstacles to be navigated around. The river continues for many more miles downstream with multiple access points but it becomes increasingly more difficult to paddle just a few miles past Dead River Park and should only be attempted by more experienced paddlers.

8

Florida, Homestead

02 :30 hrs
5.6 mi
255 ft
I

This designated canoe trail in the Everglades leads paddlers through shallow ponds and freshwater marshes that are home to lots of alligators, turtles, wading birds, and fish. This trip follows the complete loop but there is a shorter trip option available that is about 1.5 miles shorter. The trails are marked by white PVC pipes. The area can be impassible during low water so check with the national park before setting out. Mosquitos can also be an issue during certain times of the year in certain spots along the trail so find out what areas to avoid when exploring the area.

9

Florida, Pasco County

08 :34 hrs
19.1 mi
4.231971 ft
I

The Withlacoochee River originates from the Green Swamp in Central Florida and travels for many miles through rugged wilderness with sections of substantial development along the way. The river has a designated canoe trail with lots of access points that can be used to customize trips of varying distances. This trip starts from a remote launch in state forest and travels for almost 19 miles to a take-out at Silver Lake Recreation Area. There are a few other alternate access points that can be used to shorten the trip but only some of them offer parking. The put-in at Lacoochee Park requires driving on a dirt road that can be bumpy so high-clearance vehicles are recommended.

10

Louisiana, St. Tammany County

03 :16 hrs
7.3 mi
2.999998 ft
I

The Pearl River forms the border between Louisiana and Mississippi and offers some scenic paddling, especially the section that runs through the Pearl River Wildlife Management Area. The river widens as it enters Louisiana and splits into multiple channels. This section of river starts at Davis Landing on the most western river channel and follows the river south through swamp and marsh terrain to the take-out at Indian Village. The area is very rugged and full of wildlife, including gators.

See more adventures..

Explore complete list